White spaces

Mention white spaces and a lot of people would run a mile – ‘too cold, too clinical, it will get dirty!’

I want to show that this is not always the case. As a designer, I find white spaces are incredibly creative as well as calming. We have so much clutter in our lives – both physically and metaphorically –  and so much noise going on that a white space brings an almost instantaneous feeling of serenity.

Here are a few examples of how white spaces can work…

I love this apartment. I couldn’t find the designer but it is fabulous!

http://www.vectormu.com/extraordinary-small-white-apartment-design/

Below is a 3600 square foot apartment I designed in Singapore a few years ago. I decided to take out all the windows so we really could feel  we were living ‘in’ nature rather merely looking at it. Polished concrete floors, up lighting and hints of colour…

3600 sq foot apartment

I loved waking up in this bedroom listening to birdsong…

Bedroom

… and going to sleep to the sound of the crickets, frogs and a soft breeze…

Bedroom

 

… in the link below, I really like the way the designer has used white here to create a cocoon of a bedroom.

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/518195500844863532/

Going outdoors…

The use of white doesn’t have to be limited to indoors. Here is a garden I designed many years ago in London. The inspiration came from the existing gnarly trees that had a certain Japanese quality about them. I wanted the trees, the sculpture and the zinc water feature to be the focus of the garden and the white walls to form the canvas.

Use of white in gardens

… Holiday destination – I wish! The use of dreamy gauze drapes that frame the view of the  turquoise waters of the Whitsunday’s adds texture to the design and creates both an oasis of calm.

http://hayman.oneandonlyresorts.com/accommodations/haymanwing.aspx

…We are surrounded by design in all its wonderful forms. The way certain designers like Yohji Yamamoto and Hussein Chalayan in their latest collections reference natural forms.

I also love the angularity and clean lines of the young German designer Melitta Baumeister. This is architecture to wear!

http://www.melittabaumeister.com